Burda 2/2017 #106A: V-Neck Tank

Burda 2/2017 #106A is the illustrated sewing course pattern for the February 2017 issue. It features a pleat at the center front V-neck and a button closure at the center back neck.  The defining feature is a ruffle that extends from the middle of the back all the way down to the side seam at the front waist, forming a cap sleeve over the shoulder. The neckline is finished with a facing, and the armholes are finished with bias binding.

The fabric I used was a silk georgette from Fabric Mart. I needed only 2 yards of this 43″ fabric.

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Fitting adjustments:

I started with a size 38 and made the following alterations:

    • Lengthened 2″
    • Added a 3/4″ dart to the back shoulder
    • 3/8″ forward shoulder alteration
    • 1/4″ sloped shoulder alteration
    • Added a total of 2.5″ to the hip
    • Extended the bust dart 1/2″ towards the center front

 

Notes:

  • Instead of doing a narrow hem for the shoulders (which was maddening in this very lightweight, floaty fabric) I finished the edge using a rolled hem on my serger. It looks really nice with the Magnifico thread I used.
  • I also used the Magnifico thread for general construction. My go-to threads for everyday sewing are Gutermann Mara 100 or Mettler, but when working with silks and other extremely lightweight and delicate fabrics I like to use either Magnifico or #50 Tire silk thread (depending on which one has the better color match). These threads also make beautiful buttonholes in lighter weight fabrics.
  • The strap width is around 2″, very bra-strap friendly, especially with the ruffle overlay.
  • Since I plan on tucking this in most, if not all the time, I finished the hem with a two-thread serger stitch instead of a narrow hem. The thread is nice enough and blends into the pattern that even if I don’t tuck it in it still looks presentable.
  • I can easily pull this over my head without having to undo the button at the center back.

Burda 04/2016 #122 Dress

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In a previous post about Burda 04/2016 #122 I mentioned that the lining pattern could easily be used to create a simple sheath dress. That’s what I’ve done here.

The fabric I used is a stretchy viscose/lycra crepe I bought from Sawyer Brook last June. It is a mid-weight suiting with a very luxurious drape, not unlike 4-ply silk crepe. If you do a Google image search for “milly paint splatter” you can see the skirt and crop top the designer used it for.

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I stabilized the armholes and neckline with Design Plus straight stay tape, and the center back where the zipper is sewn with Design Plus superfine straight tape. The neck/armhole facing was interfaced with lightweight Pro-Tricot Deluxe from Fashion Sewing Supply. The back vent was stabilized with the lightweight Pro-Sheer Elegance, also from Fashion Sewing Supply. I was going to line this with a stretch silk, but during fitting I found that it wasn’t necessary.

When I traced the pattern for this I omitted the swayback alteration I did last time – I suspect I don’t need it with Burda patterns, though it is hard to tell with this print! Since I omitted the swayback alteration I also removed the 1/2″ of extra length I added at the center back hem.

At first I added a back vent, with a 1 5/8″ hem. Then after I tried it on I realized that I had forgotten to deepen the hem allowance on the pattern – oops! I ended up undoing the 1 5/8″ blind hem in favor of a 1/2″ stitched hem. Since I mitered the hem at the vent I had to piece in a scrap of fabric at the center back. Fortunately this fabric is so busy that the small pieced-in section is practically invisible. Since the new hem was much narrower than the original one I also ended up omitting the center back vent completely. This fabric is so stretchy that it turns out I didn’t need it at all.

Fall 2016 Wrap Dresses: Burda 09/2006 #114

This post is mostly to document some recent projects I’ve made using my much-beloved Burda 09/2006 #114 wrap dress pattern. I now have a total of eight in my wardrobe! Since this dress requires a minimum of three yards of 60″ fabric I’ve also freed up some stash storage space.

Previous versions: gray silk jersey, complete with shoulder epaulettes and pocket flaps and black silk jersey floral print.

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For most of the dresses I skipped the flaps and epaulettes (along with the sleeve tabs). I feel like they are more timeless with just a collar. I used the medium Pro-Sheer Elegance interfacing for the upper collar and lightweight Pro-Sheer Elegance for the under collar and neck facing. For the silk jersey and matte viscose jersey dresses I sewed in hanging loops made from 3/16″ cotton twill tape to the underarms. (ITY doesn’t wrinkle so I didn’t bother for either of those dresses.)

I found that construction went faster and I seemed less tired after they were done when I went about things like an assembly line vs completing one dress at a time start to finish. I cut out the dresses over the span of two days (cutting takes about 30 minutes per dress). Then I spent another day doing the fusing and serger work, which takes around 20-30 minutes and consistes of finishing the edge of the neck facings and sewing/pressing the long edges of the tie belt pieces. I then focused on sewing the rest of the dress (around two hours and 15 minutes per dress), excluding hemming. I then set up my coverstitch machine and hemmed all the sleeves and skirt hems over the span of the next few days. Between pressing up the hems and actually sewing them on the coverstitch machine takes around 15 minutes.

This eggplant dress was made from a silk jersey from Gorgeous Fabrics. I bought it four years ago! Wide width silk jerseys that are both reasonably priced and in colors I like can be difficult to find, so when I come across one I like I buy it and stash it.

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This red dress was made from a crimson ITY knit from Gorgeous Fabrics.

Ann’s description of it being a “rich deep color that will look great against so many skin tones” is so accurate! I dislike buying red fabrics online because so many of them have overly warm or orange undertones, which look hideous against my cool toned complexion. This one is one of the most neutral red fabrics I’ve come across. As you might have noticed in the photo I like to wear it with lots of gold toned jewelry.

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The black dress is also an ITY from Gorgeous Fabrics.

It is just like the crimson ITY in both weight and behavior (great drape without being clingy and presses well). This is my go-to little black dress. (And yes, I always wear it with those heels!)

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I am not the biggest fan in the world of polyester, but I wanted to add some dresses in my wardrobe that I could just throw into the washing machine and put on in the morning without having to worry about pressing. This ITY knits have the advantage of being more durable, resistant to shrinkage, and colorfast than silk jersey. I’m really impressed with them – they have a nice, heavy drape and don’t seem to be as bad with static cling as other ITYs I’ve come across. Highly recommend!

This navy dress was made from a matte viscose jersey, also from Gorgeous Fabrics.

Like my ITY fabrics it was a more recent purchase. I’m not entirely thrilled with how this one came out. I machine washed and dried it, and somehow it grew after cutting. Just before I hemmed it I washed it on hot and machine dried it on high, and it seemed like it helped shrink it down a little, but it is still a little too big. Not sure if I’m going to keep this one or not…

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This black dress was made from a wool sweater knit I purchased from Fabric Mart’s “Julie’s Picks” swatch club more than four years ago. For this one I included the front pocket flaps and shoulder epaulettes. I also made the sleeves full length.

 

It is a medium weight sweater knit. I would describe the weight as being comparable to a thick cotton interlock.

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I made this dress sometime last winter but just got around to photographing it now. I’m mostly including it in this post so you can see how the dress looks when made up in a fabric like this. Unfortunately it is too warm to wear to work (my current office is 72—77°F most days during the winter). In addition to the drape being rather meh (which I anticipated) the fabric also attracts pet hair like a magnet! Always good to have a warm semi-casual dress at hand though, so I’m going to keep it just in case.